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Nymphs and Satyr, by William Bouguereau (Detail)
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Gustave
Dore
French painter, sculptor, illustrator & printmaker
born January 6 1832- died January 25 1883

Also known as:
Louis Auguste Gustave Doré, Paul Gustave Louis Christophe Do

Nationality:
French


Biographical Information

DORÉ, LOUIS AUGUSTE GUSTAVE (1832-1883), French artist, the son of a civil engineer, was born at Strassburg on the 6th of January 1832. In 1848 he came to Paris and secured a three years engagement on the Journal pour rire. His facility as a draughtsman was extraordinary, and among the books he illustrated in rapid succession were Balzac's Contes drolatiques [Droll Tales] (1855), Dante's "Inferno" (1861), Don Quixote (1863), The Bible (1866), Paradise Lost (1866), and the works of Rabelais (1873). He painted also many large and ambitious compositions of religious or historical character, and made some success as a sculptor, his statue of Alexandre Dumas in Paris being perhaps his best-known work in this line. He died on the 25th of January 1883.

Source: Entry on the artist in the 1911 Edition Encyclopedia.

   Artist Portraits

   Artist Letters

   Books and Related Products About This Artist

Dante et Vergil dans le neuvieme cercle de l'enfer

Translated title: Dante and Virgil in the Ninth Circle of Hell
-1861
Oil on canvas
315 x 450 cm
(124.02" x 177.17")
Musee de Brou (Bourg-en-Bresse, France)

Added: 2016-03-01
The Fairies - A Scene Drawn from William Shakespeare

-1873
Oil on canvas
Private collection

Added: 2012-05-31
Two Owls

Oil on canvas
Private collection

Added: 2004-08-17
Two Owls
Les Oceanides (Les Naiades de la mer)

Translated title: Oceanides (Naiads of the Sea)
c1860-c1869
Oil on canvas
127 x 185.5 cm
(50" x 73.03")
Private collection

Added: 2001-11-19

Provenance:
Mme la Marquise Landolfo Carcano; Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 30 May 1912, lot 33; Hôtel Arouse, Paris, 17 February 1984, lot 46

The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 72­74: “Bard! willingly I would address those two together coming, Which seem so light before the wind.”

Etching
Private collection

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Added: 2004-04-30

Extract from Dante's The Divine Comedy, "Hell", Canto 5, lines 69-86. Translation by The Rev. H. F. Cary, M.A.

When I had heard my sage instructor name
Those dames and knights of antique days, o'erpower'd
By pity, well-nigh in amaze my mind
Was lost; and I began: "Bard! willingly
I would address those two together coming,
Which seem so light before the wind." He thus:
"Note thou, when nearer they to us approach.
Then by that love which carries them along,
Entreat; and they will come." Soon as the wind
Sway'd them toward us, I thus fram'd my speech:
"O wearied spirits! come, and hold discourse
With us, if by none else restrain'd." As doves
By fond desire invited, on wide wings
And firm, to their sweet nest returning home,
Cleave the air, wafted by their will along;
Thus issu'd from that troop, where Dido ranks,
They through the ill air speeding; with such force
My cry prevail'd by strong affection urg'd.

The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 105­106: “Love brought us to one death: Caina waits The soul, who spilt our life.”

Etching
Private collection

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Added: 2004-04-30

Extract from Dante's The Divine Comedy, "Hell", Canto 5, lines 99-111. Translation by The Rev. H. F. Cary, M.A.

"Love, that in gentle heart is quickly learnt,
Entangled him by that fair form, from me
Ta'en in such cruel sort, as grieves me still:
Love, that denial takes from none belov'd,
Caught me with pleasing him so passing well,
That, as thou see'st, he yet deserts me not.
Love brought us to one death: Caina waits
The soul, who spilt our life." Such were their words;
At hearing which downward I bent my looks,
And held them there so long, that the bard cried:
"What art thou pond'ring?" I in answer thus:
"Alas! by what sweet thoughts, what fond desire
Must they at length to that ill pass have reach'd!"

The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 134­135: “In its leaves that day We read no more.”

Etching
Private collection

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Added: 2004-04-30

Extract from Dante's The Divine Comedy, "Hell", Canto 5, lines 112-135. Translation by The Rev. H. F. Cary, M.A.

Then turning, I to them my speech address'd.
And thus began: "Francesca! your sad fate
Even to tears my grief and pity moves.
But tell me; in the time of your sweet sighs,
By what, and how love granted, that ye knew
Your yet uncertain wishes?" She replied:
"No greater grief than to remember days
Of joy, when mis'ry is at hand! That kens
Thy learn'd instructor. Yet so eagerly
If thou art bent to know the primal root,
From whence our love gat being, I will do,
As one, who weeps and tells his tale. One day
For our delight we read of Lancelot,
How him love thrall'd. Alone we were, and no
Suspicion near us. Ofttimes by that reading
Our eyes were drawn together, and the hue
Fled from our alter'd cheek. But at one point
Alone we fell. When of that smile we read,
The wished smile, rapturously kiss'd
By one so deep in love, then he, who ne'er
From me shall separate, at once my lips
All trembling kiss'd. The book and writer both
Were love's purveyors. In its leaves that day
We read no more."

The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 137­138: I through compassion fainting, seem’d not far From death, and like a corpse fell to the ground.

Etching
Private collection

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Added: 2004-04-30

Extract from Dante's The Divine Comedy, "Hell", Canto 5, lines 135-138. Translation by The Rev. H. F. Cary, M.A.

[....] While thus one spirit spake,
The other wail'd so sorely, that heartstruck
I through compassion fainting, seem'd not far
From death, and like a corpse fell to the ground.

The Inferno, Canto 6, lines 24­26: Then my guide, his palms Expanding on the ground, thence filled with earth Rais’d them, and cast it in his ravenous maw.

Etching
Private collection

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Added: 2004-04-30

Extract from Dante's The Divine Comedy, "Hell", Canto 6, lines 12-32. Translation by The Rev. H. F. Cary, M.A.

Cerberus, cruel monster, fierce and strange,
Through his wide threefold throat barks as a dog
Over the multitude immers'd beneath.
His eyes glare crimson, black his unctuous beard,
His belly large, and claw'd the hands, with which
He tears the spirits, flays them, and their limbs
Piecemeal disparts. Howling there spread, as curs,
Under the rainy deluge, with one side
The other screening, oft they roll them round,
A wretched, godless crew. When that great worm
Descried us, savage Cerberus, he op'd
His jaws, and the fangs show'd us; not a limb
Of him but trembled. Then my guide, his palms
Expanding on the ground, thence filled with earth
Rais'd them, and cast it in his ravenous maw.
E'en as a dog, that yelling bays for food
His keeper, when the morsel comes, lets fall
His fury, bent alone with eager haste
To swallow it; so dropp'd the loathsome cheeks
Of demon Cerberus, who thund'ring stuns
The spirits, that they for deafness wish in vain.

The Inferno, Canto 6, lines 49­52: “Thy city heap’d with envy to the brim, Ay that the measure overflows its bounds, Held me in brighter days. Ye citizens Were wont to name me Ciacco.”

Etching
Private collection

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Added: 2004-04-30

Extract from Dante's The Divine Comedy, "Hell", Canto 6, lines 36-56. Translation by The Rev. H. F. Cary, M.A.

We, o'er the shades thrown prostrate by the brunt
Of the heavy tempest passing, set our feet
Upon their emptiness, that substance seem'd.

They all along the earth extended lay
Save one, that sudden rais'd himself to sit,
Soon as that way he saw us pass. "O thou!"
He cried, "who through the infernal shades art led,
Own, if again thou know'st me. Thou wast fram'd
Or ere my frame was broken." I replied:
"The anguish thou endur'st perchance so takes
Thy form from my remembrance, that it seems
As if I saw thee never. But inform
Me who thou art, that in a place so sad
Art set, and in such torment, that although
Other be greater, more disgustful none
Can be imagin'd." He in answer thus:
"Thy city heap'd with envy to the brim,
Ay that the measure overflows its bounds,
Held me in brighter days. Ye citizens
Were wont to name me Ciacco. For the sin
Of glutt'ny, damned vice, beneath this rain,
E'en as thou see'st, I with fatigue am worn;
Nor I sole spirit in this woe: all these
Have by like crime incurr'd like punishment."