Leonardo da Vinci

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Leonardo da Vinci

Italian painter, sculptor, architect, author, engineer, inventor, lutanist, mathematician and scientist

Born circa 4/15/1452 - Died circa 1519

Born in Vinci (Florentine province, Tuscany, Italy)

Died in Amboise (Indre-et-Loire, France)

  • Artworks
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  • Images of the Artist
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Mona Lisa

circa 1503-circa 1505

Oil on poplar panel

77 x 53 cms | 30 1/4 x 20 3/4 ins

Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

Annunciation

1472-1475

Tempera on wood

98 x 217 cms | 38 1/2 x 85 1/4 ins

The Uffizi, Florence, Italy

Portrait of Ginevra Benci

1476

Oil on wood

42 x 37 cms | 16 1/2 x 14 1/2 ins

National Gallery of Art, Washington, United States

Vitruvian Man, Study of proportions, from Vitruvius's De Architectura

1492

Pen and ink

34.3 x 24.5 cms | 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 ins

Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venezia, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Virgin of the Rocks

1506

Oil on wood

189.5 x 120 cms | 74 1/2 x 47 ins

National Gallery, London, United Kingdom

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Virgin of the Rocks

1486

Oil on panel

199 x 122 cms | 78 1/4 x 48 ins

Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Adoration of the Magi

Oil on panel

246 x 243 cms | 96 3/4 x 95 1/2 ins

The Uffizi, Florence, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Madonna with Flower

circa 1478

Oil on canvas transferred from

50 x 32 cms | 19 1/2 x 12 1/2 ins

Hermitage, St Petersburg, Russian Federation

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Portrait of Cecilia Gallerani

1483-1490

Oil on wood

54.8 x 40.3 cms | 21 1/2 x 15 3/4 ins

Czartoryski Museum, Kraków, Poland

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Leonardo da Vinci was a Florentine artist, one of the great masters of the High Renaissance, who was also celebrated as a painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, and scientist. His profound love of knowledge and research was the keynote of both his artistic and scientific endeavors. His innovations in the field of painting influenced the course of Italian art for more than a century after his death, and his scientific studies—particularly in the fields of anatomy, optics, and hydraulics—anticipated many of the developments of modern science.