Jules Dalou

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Jules Dalou

31 artworks

French Realist, New Sculpture (19th Century British) sculptor

Born 12/31/1838 - Died 4/15/1902

  • Artworks
  • Biography
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  • Images of the Artist

Woman Bathing

Bronze

33 cms | 12 3/4 ins

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Manhattan, United States

Woman Bathing

circa 1870-1880

Bronze

43.2 x 26 x 20.3 cms | 17 x 10 x 7 3/4 ins

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Manhattan, United States

HD

The Young Mother

1872

Bronze

58.1 x 36.5 x 45.7 cms | 22 3/4 x 14 1/4 x 17 3/4 ins

Charity or Maternity

circa 1877

Bronze

34.4 cms | 13 1/2 ins

HD

Breton Peasant Woman

circa 1880

Terracotta; socle: red marble

24.1 cms | 9 1/4 ins

Marquis de Lafayette

1880-1881

Bronze

34.4 cms | 13 1/2 ins

HD

Nude Woman

1899

White marble; base: green marble

57.2 x 29.2 cms | 22 1/2 x 11 1/4 ins

General Lazare Hoche

circa 1900

Bronze

38.7 x 19.7 x 16.5 cms | 15 x 7 3/4 x 6 1/4 ins

Bust of a Young Woman

Bronze

45 x 32.3 x 19 cms | 17 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 7 1/4 ins

Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada

Head of a Little Boy

Bronze

30.8 x 26.7 x 20.2 cms | 12 x 10 1/2 x 7 3/4 ins

Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada

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Mode

DALOU, JULES (1838-1902), French sculptor, was the pupil of Carpeaux [1827-1875] and Duret [1804-1865], and combined the vivacity and richness of the one with the academic purity and scholarship of the other. He is one of the most brilliant virtuosos of the French school, admirable alike in taste, execution and arrangement. He first exhibited at the Salon in 1867, but when. in 1871 the troubles of the Commune broke out in Paris, he took refuge in England, where he rapidly made a name through his appointment at South Kensington. Here he laid the foundation of that great improvement which resulted in the development of the modern British school of sculpture, and at the same time executed a remarkable series of terra-cotta statuettes and groups, such as A French Peasant Woman (of which a bronze version under the title of Maternity is erected outside the Royal Exchange), the group of two Boulogne women called The Reader and A Woman of Boulogne tallying her Beads. He returned to France in 1879 and produced a number of masterpieces. His great relief of Mirabeau replying to M. de Dreux-Brz, exhibited in 1883 and now at the Palais Bourbon, and the highly decorative panel, Triumph of the Republic, were followed in 1885 by The Procession of Silenus. For the city of Paris he executed his most elaborate and splendid achievement, the vast monument, The Triumph of the Republic, erected, after twenty years work, in the Place de la Nation, showing a symbolical figure of the Republic, aloft on her car, drawn by lions led by Liberty, attended by Labor and Justice, and followed by Peace. It is somewhat in the taste of the Louis XIV. [1638-1715] period, ornate, but exquisite in every detail. Within a few days there was also inaugurated his great Monument to Alphand (1899), which almost equalled in the success achieved the monument to Delacroix [1798-1863] in the Luxembourg Gardens. Dalou, who gained the Grand Prix of the International exhibition of 1889, and was an officer of the Legion of Honor, was one of the founders of the New Salon (Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts), and was the first president of the sculpture section. In portraiture, whether statues or busts, his work is not less remarkable.

Source: Entry on the artist in the 1911 Edition Encyclopedia.