John Singleton Copley

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John Singleton Copley

102 artworks

American painter

Born 1737 - Died 1815

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Mary and Elizabeth Royall

circa 1758

Oil on canvas

146.1 x 121.9 cms | 57 1/2 x 48 ins

Public collection, ,

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Boy with a Squirrel

1760

Oil on canvas

76.8 x 63.5 cms | 30 x 25 ins

Public collection, ,

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Mrs. Samuel Quincy (Hannah Hill)

circa 1761

Oil on canvas

90.2 x 71.8 cms | 35 1/2 x 28 ins

Public collection, ,

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Lydia Lynde

circa 1762-circa 1764

Oil on canvas mounted on mason

76.2 x 64.1 cms | 30 x 25 1/4 ins

New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, United States

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John Bours

1763

Oil on canvas

76.2 x 65.4 cms | 30 x 25 3/4 ins

Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Winston-Salem, United States

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Mrs. Daniel Sargent (Mary Turner Sargent)

1763

Oil on cardboard

125.7 x 101.1 cms | 49 1/2 x 39 3/4 ins

Museum of Fine Art, SF, United States

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Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis)

circa 1763

Oil on canvas

129.8 x 104.1 cms | 51 x 41 ins

Public collection, ,

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Mrs. Jerathmael Bowers

circa 1763

Oil on canvas

126.7 x 101 cms | 49 3/4 x 39 3/4 ins

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Manhattan, United States

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Mrs. John Scoally (Mercy Greenleaf)

1763

Oil on canvas

88.9 x 68.6 cms | 35 x 27 ins

Public collection, ,

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Epes Sargent II

circa 1764

Oil on canvas

124.5 x 99.1 cms | 49 x 39 ins

Public collection, ,

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COPLEY, JOHN SINGLETON (1737-1815), English historical painter, was born of Irish parents at Boston, Massachusetts. He was self-educated, and commenced his career as a portraitpainter in his native city. The germ of his reputation in England was a little picture of a boy and squirrel, exhibited at the Society of Arts in 1760. In 1774 he went to Rome, and thence in 1775 came to England. In 1777 he was admitted associate of the Royal Academy; in 1783 he was made Academician on the exhibition of his most famous picture, the Death of Chatham, popularized immediately by Bartolozzi's elaborate engraving; and in 1790 he was commissioned to paint a portrait picture of the defence of Gibraltar. The Death of Major Pierson, in the National Gallery, also deserves mention. Copley's powers appear to greatest advantage in his portraits. He was the father of Lord Chancellor Lyndhurst.

Source: Entry on the artist in the 1911 Edition Encyclopedia.