Agnolo Bronzino

Home / Museum / Search ARC Museum

Agnolo Bronzino

35 artworks

Italian Mannerist artist

Born 1503 - Died 1572

  • Artworks
  • Biography
  • Relationships
  • Images of the Artist
  • Signatures

St. Mark

circa 1525

Oil on wood

Cappella Capponi, Santa Felicita, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

St. Matthew

circa 1525

Oil on wood

Cappella Capponi, Santa Felicita, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Holy Family

1534-1540

Oil on wood

124.5 x 99.5 cms | 49 x 39 ins

Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien, Austria

Adoration of the Shepherds

1535-1540

Oil on wood

65.3 x 46.7 cms | 25 1/2 x 18 1/4 ins

Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Adoration of the Shepherds [detail]

1535-1540

Oil on wood

Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Ugolino Martelli

circa 1535

Oil on wood

102 x 85 cms | 40 x 33 1/4 ins

Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

The Panciatichi Holy Family

1540

Oil on wood

117 x 89 cms | 46 x 35 ins

The Uffizi, Florence, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

Venus, Cupide and the Time

1540-1545

Oil on panel

147 x 117 cms | 57 3/4 x 46 ins

National Gallery, London, United Kingdom

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

St. John the Baptist

1550-1555

Oil on wood

120 x 92 cms | 47 x 36 ins

Galleria Borghese, Rome, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

The Deposition of Christ [detail]

1560

Oil on wood and fresco

Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy

Credit: Web Gallery of Art

back to the artworks

Mode

"Another cultural rein was taken into the ducal hand in 1563 when Cosimobecame president of the newly instituted Accademia del Designo in Florence.With a membership of some seventy painters, sculptors, and architects, withVasari, Bronzino, and B. Ammanti among the chief organizers, this was thefirst academy of art to be established in Europe. It had formal rules andwas governed by six consuls. It is likely that a majority of the members hadalready worked for Cosimo....After the markedly divergent styles that had characterized art in Florencein the first generation of the 16th century, a fairly widely shared styleemerged,relying more on gesture than anatomy, on the interrelationships offigures rather than on realization of the space that enclosed them...But once again, Cosimo did not call the academy and his headship of it intobeing; the initiative came from the artists themselves. When in 1564 theAcademy planned an elaborate funeral service for Michelangelo, the mostferociously independent of artists, they petitioned that it should be heldin the Medici church of San Lorenzo (although he was to be buried in S.Croce) and they did their utmost to identify the ceremony with the duke whomMichelangelo had consistantly refused to serve despite repeated invitations.The rein was slipped into Cosimo's hand by painters who wanted the preciseopposite of the demeaning guild system to which by law they had to belong.From this law, Cosimo released them in 1571, thus breaking one more linkwith the republican past from which both prince and painter wanted toescape.(J.R.Hale, "Florence and the Medici", 1977)